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Free kindle book and epub digitized and proofread by Project Les liaisons dangereuses by Choderlos de Laclos Download This eBook. Free kindle book and epub digitized and proofread by Project Gutenberg. Uniform Title, Les liaisons dangereuses. Download This eBook. Project Gutenberg · 59, free ebooks. Notes sur Laclos et Les Liaisons Dangereuses by Boisjoslin and Mossé Download This eBook.


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Complete 4 Volumes. Les Liaisons dangereuses (The Dangerous Liaisons) is a French epistolary novel by Pierre Choderlos de Laclos.. Format: Global Grey free PDF, epub, Kindle ebook Download links are below the donate buttons. Les liaisons dangereuses,.. by Laclos, Choderlos de, 2, Views. 5 Favorites. DOWNLOAD OPTIONS. download 1 file. Editorial Reviews. Review. "If this book burns, it burns as only ice can burn." - Baudelaire Download it once and read it on your Kindle device, PC, phones or tablets. Use features like Advanced Search · Kindle Store · Kindle eBooks · Humor & Entertainment . $ Read with Our Free App; Audiobook. $ Free with.

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Now, I'm quite happy to have come upon this book I just love the "Surprise Yourself" stack at my library. I was intimidated at first, but after a few pages, I was hooked. This is deliciously devious and entertaining! On the surface, reading "Les Liaisons Dangereuses" is no more difficult than following a very long Facebook conversation thread even better if By the second letter, the film "Cruel Intentions" bloomed in my mind.

On the surface, reading "Les Liaisons Dangereuses" is no more difficult than following a very long Facebook conversation thread even better if you have scandalous friends If this novel is an accurate picture of the French aristocratic class of the time, it's easy to see why revolution was brewing among the peasants and working classes.

There are no happy endings here, except maybe for me. I'm quite satisfied that the characters got what they deserved. View 2 comments. Dec 01, Manny rated it liked it Shelves: Letter But, none the less, I am grateful to her, since she reminded me that I should read it in the Letter But, none the less, I am grateful to her, since she reminded me that I should read it in the original French.

I fail to understand how I can have postponed this pleasant task so long. The rest of this review is available elsewhere the location cannot be given for Goodreads policy reasons View all 13 comments. Definitely the best epistolary book I have ever read and probably one of the best novels displaying the double morale in the eighteenth century Paris. Monsieur de Laclos masters the style, creating two hero-villain characters whom, although monsters without scruples, one can't help to admire.

They are playful, amusing, witty and skillful in the art of deception. They are also vain, prideful creatures who seek their own pleasure without caring for the outcome of their poor victims. Marquise de Mert Definitely the best epistolary book I have ever read and probably one of the best novels displaying the double morale in the eighteenth century Paris.

Marquise de Merteuil and Vicomte de Valmont are incredibly wealthy and bored to death. So they play dangerous games for entertainment, imposing challenges to each other, seducing young virgins, making adulteress out of prude virtuous women, taking revenge of formers lovers ruining their reputation What's more, they are honourable and well received in society!

Imagine their mirth when they accomplish every evil scheme they propose while they become their victims' only friends and saviours. But apart from the elaborated style and the amusing display of strategic tactics which thread the story, one can't miss the allusion to the thin line of what's morally right or wrong. Is "what is socially accepted" the true and only way? Marquise de Merteuil and Vicomte de Valmont are not exemplary models of sincerity or frankness, but they challenge the imposed rules somehow, they outwit hypocrisy, the problem is that they only do it to achieve personal gratification, corrupting their souls and everyone who dares to trust in them.

In my opinion, it's incredible that a novel written more than years ago, might still stir deep emotions in those who can invest a moment of their time to think about the possible reasons that led a man like M. Don't take this novel only as a mere diversion, it's much more than that. It's about recognising that each of us has some of the Vicomte or of the Marquise in us, we are all vain and proud and think ourselves superior to the rest. That's why I value this work, because it reminds us of what wretched and capricious creatures we humans can become.

View all 14 comments. One of my all time favourite books, Les Liaisons dangereuses is a tour de force written entirely in letters. It is the only literature that nobleman Laclos every wrote but he hit a grand slam with this one.

Intrigue, sex, betrayal - it is a gripping story told in the margins between the written word and the gaps between the letters. Hard to describe without spoiling the pleasure of potential readers, suffice it to say that the movie as awesome as Uma and Close and Malkovich were in the fil One of my all time favourite books, Les Liaisons dangereuses is a tour de force written entirely in letters.

Hard to describe without spoiling the pleasure of potential readers, suffice it to say that the movie as awesome as Uma and Close and Malkovich were in the film version is not even close to as exciting and gripping as the original.

View all 5 comments. Jan 30, K. When you rate a book, do you consider the introduction written by a different person , appendices, blurbs and entries in Wikipedia? I mean do you consider the historical background of the story? Or you ignore all of them and just rate the story as if you do not know anything about those? Two schools of thought. I know some people just read and then rate the story only. I know some who read not only the whole book When you rate a book, do you consider the introduction written by a different person , appendices, blurbs and entries in Wikipedia?

I know some who read not only the whole book but everything interesting about it aside from what is provided in their book's edition. I belong to the second one and this is one of the reasons why I like historical, biographical or biblical fictions.

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That is also the reason why I am giving this book, Les Liaisons Dangereuses Dangerous Liaisons by Choderlos de Laclos first published as a book in , a 4-star rating I really liked it. The despicable, cunning, conniving, wicked, inutile, gullible characters are definitely not new to any of us, regular fiction readers.

We all know those from the myriad of characters in novels and other forms of literature. The epistolary form of storytelling is not new to me too. Think 84, Charing Cross Road or Clarissa. A novel originally written in beautiful language like French is common now. But check this novel's history: For more than 2 centuries, people are still reading this book and not few have this in their top 10 favorite novels.

Check Top 10 Novels by your favorite authors here. For example, Emma Donoghue listed this book as her no. A The poetic even though lengthy way the characters express themselves in the letters. I think the fact that it was originally written in French, which I have no knowledge of, affected the prose now that it is in English.

It is flowery and vague at times but I find it strangely different, thus interesting, compared the standard style of our contemporary novelists. B The cunning and despicable characters are so dubious and evil that I was full of hatred while reading. Reminded me of the libertines in Marquise de Sade's Days of Sodom. Now that I know that the authors', i. C The imagination of De Laclos and the way he interwove the lives of the characters were just awesome.

The changing of the hearts, the treachery, the turning of the tables, e. I just feel happy having read this book. Now I just don't rely my knowledge of this work on the two movie adaptations. I have read the real stuff and not many of readers nowadays have the patience to read and appreciate a classic though archaic work like this. Thank you to my reading buddy Regine for not giving up on me and Laclos. I have to admit that I thought of dropping this book when we were halfway but she said that she would go on and so I just continued.

I am happy I did. Come back, my dear Vicomte, come back. Thus starts this tale of deceit and corruption through seduction, with a summons from the Marquise de Merteuil to her confidante and former lover, the Vicomte de Valmont. Unknown to Madame la Marquise, this seemingly innocuous petition will set the snowball in a downwards motion, because M. Valmont decides to not hurry up back to Paris as his former mistress wishes, and decides to share his devious plans for Madame de Tourvel with her by letter.

Unamused, the Marquise throws in a challenge, daring him to give sound proof of his success in seducing the devout woman, which seems doubtful according to her. On her part, she also undertakes the seduction of Danceny, the man she loves and that loves the girl in return.

Everyone is punished in this story in one way or another. I can see why the preferred character could be Valmont, in all his rakish glory.

Notes sur Laclos et Les Liaisons Dangereuses by Boisjoslin and Mossé

Female villains are thin on the ground, and female villains who are brilliant and on par with or superior to their male counterparts or allies are scarcer. Both she and Valmont are self-centred and often heartless, uninterested in anything but their pleasure and the amusement of their games and outwitting everyone for entertainment, regardless of who they may hurt. And, I am sure this will raise eyebrows, I find her actually more sympathetic than Valmont. Both she and Valmont are equally cruel, equally decadent, equal libertines, equally in love with themselves, they share the same principles and ideas, the same cynicism, etc.

And yet, only Merteuil is forced to be a hypocrite in addition to all that, only she has to feign to be caring and virtuous, only she has to worry about her reputation and defend her virtue, only she has to put up with the old matrons for the sake of her social standing.

You know why? Just look at Valmont.

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In the words of Madame de Volanges, she cannot afford to show him the door. Indeed, the only difference between Merteuil and Valmont is their genre. She has to be a hypocrite in order to enjoy life as she wants, she has to bow down to social norms imposed on women and manoeuvre within these restrictions, or lose all. She plays a game of deception on three fronts: The author has him state this fact in a letter to the Marquise: Whereas you, wielding skilfully the weapons of your sex, triumph by subtlety, I, rendering his imprescriptible rights to man, subjugated by authority.

Boredom, combined with her desire to enjoy her dissolute ways and not be subjugated to any man—she never remarried for that reason—leads her to become as she is. And, although both she and Valmont are duly given their just deserts in the end, one cannot shake off the uncomfortable feeling that the Marquise was punished extra as happens with women who dare colour outside the lines.

To me, she's simply amongst the best villainess-heroines in literature. View all 10 comments. At the centre of this novel are the main characters, the lothario Vicomte de Valmont, and his former lover the widow Marquise de Merteuil.

At the same time, the Vicomte tries his hand at seducing the prudish married Presidente de Tourvel. I will even dare ravish her from the God whom she adores. What delight, to be in turns the object and the victor of her remorse! Far be it from me to destroy the prejudices which sway her mind! They will add to my happiness and my triumph. Let her believe in virtue, and sacrifice it to me; let the idea of falling terrify her, without preventing her fall; and may she, shaken by a thousand terrors, forget them, vanquish them only in my arms.

The amount of detail that they put into their game is truly astounding. Forget Iago, these two are devil incarnates; very Machiavellian. Despite how evil these two are, they are at the same time fascinating. The book did have a Cruel Intentions feel to it but it only makes sense that such a book would provide inspiration to Hollywood. View all 9 comments. I'm amazed, these two principal characters that are the very incarnations of malice have incredibly salient and correct anecdotes about love and the beauty of sex considering they use it to humiliate others.

While the woman Merteuil is an expert in deciphering and deconstructing human emotions and its repercussions, Valmont is a virtuoso of reading human reactions even in the slightest form of subtle and heavily-attempted hidden gestures; which enables him to translate it to the emotions of hi I'm amazed, these two principal characters that are the very incarnations of malice have incredibly salient and correct anecdotes about love and the beauty of sex considering they use it to humiliate others.

While the woman Merteuil is an expert in deciphering and deconstructing human emotions and its repercussions, Valmont is a virtuoso of reading human reactions even in the slightest form of subtle and heavily-attempted hidden gestures; which enables him to translate it to the emotions of his hapless victims thereby making him a virtual mind reader that aids him to know what should be his next move. As incrementally subtle and as enormously persuasive he is in the arts of rhetorics and inconspiciously obsequious seductions, he invariably wins their confidence until he met his match in Madame de Tourvel who possesses all the qualities he lacks virtue but is most sought after of, for which he will use it to keep her conscious of how depraved her submissions to Valmont are but will still leave her unchecked that she still wouldn't be able to stop herself.

Apart from this, Choderlos' work is a reflection of how abusive and oppressive the French aristocracy was, with notable real life examples as Marquis de Sade and the Earl of Rochester. This also gave us a look of how the French monarchy was gradually declining in popularity until such reasons, with the latter as the catalyst, helped in fuelling the revolution.

Read it. And anyone else who would who love to see the insights of love and relationships, politics and pragmatism would be very interested to know how we could understand that even the slightest mistakes we so avoid in accomplishing our tasks will only add to the beauty of completing them. Knowing that in life, two factors that are of striking contrast will only enhance the candor and realistic nature of actions, whether in human nature or in words of love, when one professes it to someone personally that incoherency of words will only add to its coherence.

Thank you for your time. Salamat po! View 1 comment. Anyone who enjoys a good 18th century scandal ;. Recommended to Anne by: I love this book to distraction. Quite literally. Simply put, it is wonderfully twisty, delightfully witty and shockingly scandalous. It will make you laugh, sigh, wonder, exclaim, and, if you're anything like me, hold you under its spell for a long time. Set in 18th century France before the Revolution and written in epistolary form, Les Liaisons dang I love this book to distraction.

Set in 18th century France before the Revolution and written in epistolary form, Les Liaisons dangereuses is an epic tale of seduction, deceit, love and revenge, as well as an excellent portrait of the moral corruption of the time. Although written over years ago and aimed at mirroring the society's ugly reflection, it was fascinating to see all the parallels that can be made with our society today. We live our lives so differently that it almost seems as though we were not of the same planet, yet the basic principles and fatal human tendencies portrayed in the story are as much true and applicable today as they were in the 18th century.

The novel centers around two very bored, very jaded, very wicked French aristocrats, the Marquise de Merteuil and the Vicomte de Valmont, former lovers, but forever accomplices, best friends and confidantes, who have nothing better to do with their time and intelligence than scheme and manipulate others for their own amusement. Masterminds of the first order, they read, decipher and interpret human ways to such a degree that, for all their outrageous depravity, one can't help but admire them.

Any villainous project they have in mind is sure not only to succeed at the complete detriment of others and in the utter ruination of their victim for their own benefit, but to be undertaken in such a way as to make them look like veritable heroes and the sole friends and saviours of their innocent victims.

Seriously, the way they work is so mind-bogglingly amazing that I had to put my book down several times to assimilate all the glory of what had just happened. Vicious and evil to the core, the Marquise and the Vicomte are truly dangerous, and the best villains I have encountered so far in any book. Completely ahead of her time, she refuses to mould herself to the social norms, and becomes her own creation. Seriously, that woman is incredible, and I find her endlessly fascinating.

I could expand about her all day long, but instead I will simply direct you to Marquise's review , where she explains everything perfectly.

At last, I have found something to alleviate my boredom! It'll be soooo much fun for us both; you get to enjoy her, and I get to laugh incessantly as I think about her husband finding out that she's unchaste. What do you say??! Isn't it brilliant!? It'll be way better than being shut up in the country with nothing whatsoever to do!

It's going to be awesome!! My project is way more awesome! But fine, if it amuses you, go for it, and bring me back the proof that she gave herself up completely to you.

What is this I hear! You are staying at Mme de Rosemonde's with le Vicomte de Valmont??! Don't say I didn't warn you! Darn it, I didn't need that. But I shall find a way, hahahaha!!! I don't want to do anything wrong, but I do so want to write to him and not see him being miserable because of me! You have my blessing!! Thought you should know they've been writing letters to each other! I beg of you, alleviate my suffering! Tell me you love me too!

Don't make me unhappy! When are you coming back? Are you dead? Why don't you reply? Let me work, and don't worry.

The Devoted Prude cannot resist me much longer. Who could? I am so irresistible. I cannot love you back, and you know that! Don't even try! Don't torment me! I can be your friend though: You were right, he truly is horrible! He won't leave me alone!! I told you he was top-of-the-top dangerous! Tell him to go away already! Don't stay there with him, everybody will think you are being compromised. Wee, weeeeee!! You are so cute! P What fools men are! Honestly, I have to manage everything if I want it to be done right.

When you bungle folly after folly, you come running back to me each time, and I'm always the one who has to take you out of scrapes. I was definitely born to dominate your sex and avenge my own. In truth, the only times they were completely honest and true to themselves were by writing to each other.

They are heinous, to be sure, and their behaviour is despicable, but it was so engrossing to follow their progress and to be surprised by all the twists and turns that ensued.

Valmont made me laugh out loud several times with the tactics he employed with Mme de Tourvel, and Merteuil was simply glorious in her expert manipulation and toying of everyone's confidences and affections.

And for all their evilness, those two really and truly comprehended human nature and, when taken out of context, wrote some truly beautiful passages on love, character and relationships.

It really showed how well they understood everything, and only rendered it more afflicting that they should use their talents to torment others. As the story progresses and the plot thickens, I became more and more shocked at their audacity, and in the end, one cannot but feel that they well and truly deserved the terrible endings they suffered.

Typically, I try to avoid books with unhappy and tragic endings. I'm a rainbows-and-sunshine type of girl who delights in happily-ever-afters and evil villains redeemed, but as Les Liaisons dangereuses is not a fluffy historical romance where all's well that ends well, the ending, I must admit, greatly affected me and left me more than a little distressed.

Somehow having the two leads unmasked and their perfidy revealed made me doubly realize just how vile and rotten they were, and their antics, previously captivating and delectable in all their perverted glory, now seen through the eyes of the victims have lost much of their charm, and are seen in their rightful disgust and contempt. Such is the power of this book, that you love the villains but agree they deserve the ending they get, and their true nature revealed and all the consequences it encompasses leaves you torn between your previous admiration of their wicked minds, and your newly-found realization of the disgust of their behaviour.

This is a book that messes with you, I warn you! Or maybe it's just me being overly sensitive and dramatic, that's a huge possibility too ; Now, I am in awesome-book-is-over-I-can't-stop-thinking-about-it mode, where I go about my daily functions like a robot, not seeing, hearing, or understanding anything save what has to do with Les Liaisons. Such a wonderful state, yet one you can't wait to get over, right? Definitely one of my top favourite books of all time!

In fact, it's even worse in the book! View all 46 comments. I slightly recoil.

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The epistolary form is so frightfully dull. This stream of melodramatic back-and-forth plot-explaining missives lacked any real narrative drive for me, as bitchily funny as the two corrupt lovers were on occasion. I got enough from pp or so. Enough for me. By the way the movie version of this is terrific, featuring the hammy delights of a youngish John Malkovich and the nubile breasts of a younger Uma Thurman. The 18th century is a tough nut to crack.

Its most famous books are boring. It's an explosively smutty era, but even most of the smut isn't that great. But there are a few weird gems that slip through the cracks: Epistolaries were big back then, and LaClos makes better use of letters than anyone since Shakespeare; it'll take Wilkie Collins to match him. The letters are the plot, making this metafiction; the The 18th century is a tough nut to crack. The letters are the plot, making this metafiction; their content and their incriminating existence shape and drive the action.

This is the best advertisement for Snapchat I've ever seen. It's known as an immoral novel, and it was banned almost immediately and permanently, and you could think of it as an anti- Pamela: The filth is one reason it's fun, but the reason it's great is its terrific character insight. Valmont and, most of all, the inimitable Merteuil are perfectly, subtly, carefully drawn; their view spoiler [tragic hide spoiler ] arcs clearly laid out and never escapable.

They say a lot on paper; they say more between the lines. You root for all of them. Even the view spoiler [ casualties hide spoiler ] minor characters are fully fleshed out and sympathetic. It's bizarre that LaClos only wrote one book; he seems perfectly in control of every sentence. This is a page-turner, a thriller, a gamechanger, and one of my favorite books. Translation notes: Helen Constantine's recentish one for Penguin got good reviews in my research, and I totally loved it.

The voices are distinct; the language is readable without being distractingly modern.

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The introduction is more or less total bullshit. I just re-watched Cruel Intentions last night and it's still good trashy fun, but it doesn't do a very good job of adapting the book.

The biggest problem is Valmont: And it flubs the ending. Sarah Michelle Gellar is adequate. Selma Blair seems to be acting in a different movie - a broad slapstick comedy - but it's entertaining, and Cecile isn't taken very seriously in the book either so that works out fine.

Reese Witherspoon is good but her breasts walk away with every scene they're in. That's one of the all-time great cinematic portrayals of breasts. It's been a while since I've seen the 80s Dangerous Liaisons with Glenn Close, Malkovich and Uma Thurman; I remember it being really good but weren't the former two like way, way too old for those roles?

Both were around Illustrations par Georges Barbier merci Book Portrait! Additional Letters Appendix 2: Selected Adaptations of 'Dangerous Liaisons' Notes.

Jan 04, Sketchbook rated it it was amazing. Only a country like France, which takes sex seriously with a smile, as Britain does snobbery with a snoot, could produce this ironic novel.

Laclos withdrew following his unsettling classic of sexual manners, Valmont-Merteuil reign high on my list of literary favs. Overbred, overindulged, the ex-lovers become sexual conspirators after tossing other partners. Sex for them is an intrigue of shared espionage.

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Urbane, amusing, they strike a cynical assault on society. The psychological rewards ar Only a country like France, which takes sex seriously with a smile, as Britain does snobbery with a snoot, could produce this ironic novel. The psychological rewards are as great as the dramatic ones.

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Virtue, like sincerity, is never enough. Sex expert Roger Vadim made the only film version worth seeing, , starring Moreau- Philipe. Malicious pleasure and physical pleasure, as Laclos realized, bunch edgy, amorous tangles. Forget Love. En fait, un bon livre, c'est comme une bonne paire de chaussures.

Les Liaisons dangereuses, donc: Complete 4 Volumes. It is the story of the Marquise de Merteuil and the Vicomte de Valmont, two rivals and ex-lovers who use seduction as a weapon to humiliate and degrade others, all the while enjoying their cruel games and boasting about their manipulative talents.

As an epistolary novel, the book is composed entirely of letters written by the various characters to each other. In particular, the letters between Valmont and the Marquise drive the plot, with those of their victims and other characters serving as contrasting figures to give the story its depth. The Red and the Black Stendhal. The Charterhouse of Parma Stendhal. Nightmare Abbey Thomas Love Peacock. A Tale of the Christ Lew Wallace. Are novels useful, or are they prejudicial to the morals?

Undoubtedly Richardson, who is read and cited every where, though prolix and diffuse, has not a little contributed to the practice of pure morality; and yet, on the other hand, what mischiefs have been produced by the immense multitude of novels of all sorts with which France and all Europe have been overrun for some years past; and, as if the evil done by these temporary plagues was not sufficiently accomplished during their short existence, it is prolonged by reviving them in eternal collections.

A novel, the morality of which is equivocal, is a very dangerous poison; a novel that only possesses mediocrity, is at best useless. Even a good novel is but aliment for a child, or some weak being, to whom morality unadorned is a disgusting object. Hence we may conclude, that every thinking man will take care to banish this kind of works from his library. He will then likewise proscribe that novel, now so much prized, called Dangerous Connections, or Letters collected in a Society, and published for the Instruction of other Societies.

After having read a few pages of this work, one is almost led to think this title a piece of pleasantry; the letters of Madame de Merteuil, and of the Viscount de Valmont, published truly for the instruction of society. Is it in order to form people to the detestable art of seduction, or to inspire them with a horror of it? I am far from a wish to calumniate the author, who, I am assured, is a military man of the highest character for wit and good conduct; but his work, which seems to have a moral end in view, is in reality very dangerous.

It has been said to be a picture of the manners of a certain class in society; and, if it was not a resemblance, where would be its utility? Must monsters be created to cause in us an aversion of ordinary vices? If it is true, it ought to have been concealed; there are shocking nudities which our minds revolt at rather than receive any instruction from. The veil that covers the Tiberiuses and the Messalinas, ought not to be wholly lifted up. Young men will find in this novel easy means of seduction; young women will here see portraits of embellished vice; and old libertines will be amused by the exploits of Valmont.

But what a monster is Valmont, if such a character exists; and those who know that class of society, assure us, they have met with many such. If there really are such beings, ought not their society to be avoided carefully? It is a forest filled with robbers: It is a road full of great precipices, to avoid falling into which, we must be very circumspect. What a character is the Marchioness de Merteuil! Sometimes she is a Medea, sometimes a Messalina.

Read the tenth letter: