JARHEAD EBOOK DOWNLOAD

admin Comment(0)

Anthony Swofford's Jarhead is the first Gulf War memoir by a frontline infantry Jarhead - A Marine's Chronicle of the Gulf War and Other Battles ebook by. Jarhead: A Marine's Chronicle of the Gulf War and Other Battles by Anthony Borrow · DAISY for print-disabled Download ebook for print-disabled (DAISY). The ideal pdf i at any time go through. It can be loaded with knowledge and wisdom Its been developed in an exceedingly straightforward way and it is just soon.


Author: MAXIE COACHMAN
Language: English, Spanish, Indonesian
Country: Thailand
Genre: Science & Research
Pages: 615
Published (Last): 29.04.2016
ISBN: 576-1-64952-545-9
ePub File Size: 29.75 MB
PDF File Size: 17.57 MB
Distribution: Free* [*Free Regsitration Required]
Downloads: 36175
Uploaded by: MOLLIE

Jarhead: A Solder's Story of Modern War (Film tie-in edition) PDF, please refer to the link listed below and download the ebook or get access to other information. mounted tank monitor with built-in decibel siren, jarhead tank gauge, chronicle of the gulf war download pdf, free pdf jarhead a marines chronicle of the. Jarhead book. Read reviews from the world's largest community for readers. Anthony Swofford's Jarhead is the first Gulf War memoir by a frontline inf.

Also available as: Not in United States? Choose your country's store to see books available for purchase. Anthony Swofford's Jarhead is the first Gulf War memoir by a frontline infantry marine, and it is a searing, unforgettable narrative. When the marines -- or "jarheads," as they call themselves -- were sent in to Saudi Arabia to fight the Iraqis, Swofford was there, with a hundred-pound pack on his shoulders and a sniper's rifle in his hands.

In other words, Die for Oil, Sucker! Because it's hard for even the boots on the ground to miss that what they are most likely protecting is the "economic interests" of the USA. Powerful book. Everyone should read it. That was terrible! Mar 24, Jessie added it. This book and the movie it inspired will always be at the top of my list. This is the most realistic look at war from the viewpoint of any service member. You join the military thinking I'm gonna go kick doors in, blow stuff up, and end human lives when in all actuality most service members never see combat of any type.

Mind you in this book and in the movie the author and his unit get mortared and shot at a couple of times but nothing major. The biggest thing that I love to point out about this This book and the movie it inspired will always be at the top of my list. The biggest thing that I love to point out about this story is that the Marine Corp wasted thousands and thousands of dollars to train the author to be a sniper and then when he got his opportunity to take a shot, they said no.

That is a testament to the way most of the military operates today. You will get the training but you will never be allowed to use it.

This man goes to war all geared up and ready to go. Motivated and ready to die if needs be just to get told sorry you're just gonna have to go on ahead and sit this one out while still going through the torture of being semi-involved. This is one of the most truthful war stories I've ever read.

Jun 16, Greg rated it did not like it.

If I could give this book zero stars I would. This has nothing to do with the 1st gulf war. It has to do with the ramblings of an immoral, narcissistic misogynist with a chip on his shoulder who should have been kicked out of the Marine Corps during 1st phase. Swofford exaggerates or flat-out lies about many of his experiences, i. The author seems to focus on all the seedier aspects that are present in Marine Corps life - at least the life of some Marines such as drinking, drugs, violence, sleeping around with prostitutes, and people serving for God knows what reason nothing patriotic or even as practical as money for college and presents this as the way the whole Marine Corps organization is designed to function.

This is dishonest. I served in a different Marine Corps and I feel that the discipline I learned has helped me succeed in the real world.

I served with many good men and women and a few questionable ones.

Jarhead : A Marine's Chronicle of the Gulf War and Other Battles by Anthony Swofford

This book is worthless as a chronicle of the gulf war. It only serves to reveal how much of a whiny crybaby the author is about his experiences and makes you wonder how on earth he ever managed to be a sniper unless he is lying about that too. Having seen the film years ago, I'd always wanted to read the book. Would it bring a different perspective? Would it add to what I saw and understood from the film?

Yes it would. Yes it did. I've always been one of those girls who's pretty vocal about not understanding why men choose to join the military; who tries to argue that surely there's a better way out of whatever it is you're escaping than fighting other men?

I never understood what was going through a man's head to want to kill. But Having seen the film years ago, I'd always wanted to read the book. But this book brought me into the mind of a man who made that choice. And for the first time, I saw clearly from a distinct male perspective, because Anthony Swofford writes with such power and honesty, that I felt like I understood for the first time.

And when male friends were talking about conflicts in their younger lives at school, I saw that Swofford was truly showing a male perspective, because there were similarities in motivations and reactions and group behaviour.

I read this book fast. I wrote in the margins. I underlined sentences. I turned corners of pages. I finished the book almost breathless, having felt the fear and anger and frustration these men experienced. I was spent by the end. I need to see the film again. And I will read this book again. Lest we forget If you go into this book expecting fire fights, skirmishes, battles and sorties, then you are coming at this book from the wrong direction, or you have the wrong book.

Jarhead is what the title says it is. A book about a Jarhead. A young man in the service of the United States Marine Corp. Don't go into the book expecting anything but that. It concerns a Marine's journey towards becoming a Marine and a Sniper and who then joins the boots on the ground in the Middle east for the Gulf War conflict If you go into this book expecting fire fights, skirmishes, battles and sorties, then you are coming at this book from the wrong direction, or you have the wrong book.

It concerns a Marine's journey towards becoming a Marine and a Sniper and who then joins the boots on the ground in the Middle east for the Gulf War conflict. It is also about a boy becoming a man, but you should expect that from a book such as this.

A book that has been a literary triumph for the author. Literary triumphs usually include some form of angst and evolution. I wanted to give this book 5 stars as the writing took my breath away, but in the end I was turned off by the authors constant preoccupation with sex and sexual metaphors.

Anthony Swofford seems to have a major sex fixation issue which goes beyond the mention of the frequent prostitutes and veneral diseases. He sure does fixate on sex. Half of it wasn't necessary. It's no secret.

Men will be men, boys will be boys. I am not a prude, anyone who knows me knows that I am far from it, but comparing things, for example, to the 'tight insides of a woman' twice in one paragraph, seems more inserted no pun intended for it's shock value and not it's relevance value. So, this made me drop a star from an otherwise fantastic book. I would recommend it though. Even to people who don't usually read war non fiction.

As a side note, it was quite interesting to get up close and personal with the introduction of the very first Barrett sniper rifles as they were released in a small number to all branches of the military, SF, SEAL, Sniper teams etc before the Gulf war officially kicked off. Hard to imagine that it was only in the early 90's that the military started equipping their elite teams with a bonafide sniper rifle. I had loved the movie adaptation with Jake Gyllenhaal playing the lead but I loved the book even more.

Ebook download jarhead

Just…no words for this. None at all. It was that amazing. This is by no means an explicitly anti-war novel. Anthony Swofford was a U.

You may also like: PAANO MAG DOWNLOAD NG EBOOK

His whole experience in coloured by power-hungry and vicious officers, rowdy nights out with fellow Marines and of course, the in your face brutality of killing This is by no means an explicitly anti-war novel. His whole experience in coloured by power-hungry and vicious officers, rowdy nights out with fellow Marines and of course, the in your face brutality of killing innocent people in Iraq.

It brings to mind the contempt for officers during Vietnam when grunts used to frag their officers who tried to send them on virtually suicidal missions. But it is clear the the war was short and still left Swofford and his fellow marines with fucking strong images.

The scene that left the biggest impression on me was when he walked into a circle of dead Iraqi soldiers and sat with them. So although Swofford draws conclusions I would not agree with, like how he hates war but still sees it as necessary, the reality of the story he tells leaves me with facts and anecdotes that hardens my own conclusions in that war is a brutal thing that only benefits the rulers who do not have to go to the front-line to fight it and risk their own lives.

This is some of the very best war writing, and hence reading, I have ever encountered. Unlike some even outstanding authors, Mr. Swofford is a superbly accomplished reader as well, which made hearing the author's presentation of his work doubly enjoyable.

Ebook download jarhead

Swofford was a Marine sniper in the first Gulf War. He is unflinchingly honest in examining everything about the whole experience from boot This is some of the very best war writing, and hence reading, I have ever encountered. He is unflinchingly honest in examining everything about the whole experience from boot camp to combat, to his experiences as a veteran to his thoughts on life, love, death and getting through each day during the whole time. We see him in his heroic moments and at his worst times as well.

If you want to read more Swofford, you might try his Exit A http: Young and Female in the U. Mark Pendleton http: DH Jeff was thoughtful enough to pick me up a copy. I'm glad he's not a marine, or at least anyone like Mr. Honestly, I kept thinking, "what a horse's a-- this guy Swofford is. Especially while they're bemoaning their unfaithful women at home? But these items paled in comparison to the narrative close to the beginning of the book of what evidently was the desert version of a "code red," only involving the rape of a fellow marine because he " I sincerely hope I misunderstood this charming narrative and will berate myself for my immediate gut reaction of "these guys are indeed expendable and it's a good thing we have so many stupid, violent, drunk, sexually diseased ones to throw at the enemy," if that is the case.

Then the aforementioned promiscuous philosophe whines at the end that he didn't get to kill anyone. At least it was a quick read. View all 6 comments. People seem to either love this book or hate it, taking it as an honest account of the nasty, brutish and short lives of Marine grunts or as a trumped-up, pretentious load of BS.

Certainly, the author seems to be inspired by the Vietnam movies he frequently cites, in that the tone of the book can be superficially read as anti-war while in the same breath glorifying the nihilistic attitude of the protagonist.

One reviewer heavily criticises Swofford's mention of books and reading, seeing it as va People seem to either love this book or hate it, taking it as an honest account of the nasty, brutish and short lives of Marine grunts or as a trumped-up, pretentious load of BS.

One reviewer heavily criticises Swofford's mention of books and reading, seeing it as vacuous name-dropping; it is true that only three books in all are named: On the other hand, could one expect him to be? Still, it might be fun to know what young Swofford thinks about the Iliad, reading it as he does during a war - does he see himself as an Achilles, and does he appreciate the layers and ambiguities in the potrayal of heroism?

Given the opportunity, I would have the protagonist read Xenophon's Anabasis, another memoir of a war in Mesopotamia. Jun 25, Labijose rated it really liked it. I liked both the book and the movie. Jan 25, Chana rated it liked it Shelves: I don't know. The drill instructor in basic screams in his ear "faggot, addict, cum-sucker, bitchmaster, dickskinner, dickfuck, fuckforbrains, no pecker, and lilywhitebitch"; pornography is rampant, going to bars and "screwing whores" seems like a goal most of the Marines have, drinking is worse than in a frat house, the dead enemies are desecrated and stolen from, the leadership is not trusted nor trus I don't know.

The drill instructor in basic screams in his ear "faggot, addict, cum-sucker, bitchmaster, dickskinner, dickfuck, fuckforbrains, no pecker, and lilywhitebitch"; pornography is rampant, going to bars and "screwing whores" seems like a goal most of the Marines have, drinking is worse than in a frat house, the dead enemies are desecrated and stolen from, the leadership is not trusted nor trustworthy, the reasons for war are suspect, patriotism doesn't seem to be part of the equation, and the men who return are bitter and damaged.

I am really not understanding if the Marine Corp was always this way and I just didn't understand that. I always had admiration for the Marines, but I have some serious reservations about the Corp they call it "the suck" as described here. Most of the death and injuries to U. The Iraqis at that point seemed pretty ill-armed and ill prepared for war. How much damage in international relations did the U.

Was that war about oil and money? Before he ever leaves for Iraq he says, " Filmic images of death and carnage are pornography for the military man The grunt dies for nothing, for fifteen thousand poorly placed rounds; the sniper dies for that one perfect shot. Actually he says something interesting about that too, "It's not original to say that the combat unit works like a family--but the best combat unit works like a dysfunctional family, and the ways and means of dysfunction are also the ways and means of survival.

I remember them doing that but I don't remember why they were doing that. Just age old hatred? So, I don't know about this book. I am missing too much information, I don't know what is true and what is not.

I am left with an unfavorable impression of the Marine Corp, but maybe I am just not big-minded enough to let boys facing death act out.

I mean besides being really crude, they are also undoubtedly very tough and brave.

See a Problem?

My favorite war book is Flags of Our Fathers, but that was written by the son of a soldier, not the soldier himself. Maybe the soldier himself would have written something different. But that book left me feeling that the Marine Corp were our American heroes. This book left me feeling that any Marine who wasn't twisted before he joined would certainly be afterwards, and I hope that that is not true.

But maybe this book is written by a man who took the worst of the Marines and compressed it into a very bitter and ugly account of his time in the Marines. Or maybe this is the natural result of training men to be killers. I wonder what other Marines thought about this book.

I feel like I should say, regardless of what here is true or not true, and how the Marines really are; I depend on the U. I hope they are conducting themselves honorably, but even if this is not always the case, I still want to say thank you to every member of the U. I am not without military ties myself; my father and uncle fought in WWII in the Navy, my father-in-law fought in Germany in WWII-he was a Richie Boy, my son is a Captain in the Army National Guard and has served at Guatanamo, my son-in-law served three years in the Israeli army, my close friend's son and his wife both served overseas; the son in Iraq and his wife in Afghanistan.

I am grateful to the U. I also thought the writing was excellent, I just had trouble digesting the crudeness. Jan 09, Tung rated it did not like it Shelves: The acclaimed memoir from a Marine who served in Operation Desert Storm.

This book irritated the heck out of me; I found it completely overrated. The only compliments I can pay this book are twofold: For instance, Swofford describes a moment after the war has The acclaimed memoir from a Marine who served in Operation Desert Storm.

For instance, Swofford describes a moment after the war has ended where he and his platoon mates get to use the captured enemy ammunition and weapons to shoot whatever they want. And the description of the joy and relief and rage that finally gets to be released in this moment of testosterone and war is spot-on. Swofford conveys a chilling sense of what it is like to be under enemy fire, and he also communicates a palpable sense of the fog of war. Tell us what you like, so we can send you books you'll love.

Sign up and get a free eBook! Trade Paperback. Price may vary by retailer. Add to Cart Add to Cart. About The Book. Reading Group Guide. About The Author. Dan Winters.

Anthony Swofford.

Rise of the Tudors. The Thief's Tale. Thunder of the Gods: Empire VIII. Stasi Wolf. Blood and Blade. As Dust to the Wind. Peter Darman.

Rome's Lost Son. Killer of Kings. Dan Brown. Gate of the Dead. David Gilman. War of the Wolf. Bernard Cornwell. Andrew Frediani. Battle For Rome. Ian James Ross. Paris Spring. James Naughtie. Personal with bonus short story Not a Drill. Playing With Death. Scourge of Rome.

Douglas Jackson. Warriors of the Storm. The Good Mother. Viper's Blood. Nothing Short of Dying. Erik Storey. A Divided Spy.

Charles Cumming. Warrior of Woden. Jonas Jonasson. Sons of Taranis. Britannia Book 3 of the Veteran of Rome Series. William Kelso. Bear Grylls: Ghost Flight. Bear Grylls. Sword and Scimitar. The Black Flag. The Racketeer. John Grisham. Hotels, Hospitals, and Jails.

Anthony Swofford. How to write a great review. The review must be at least 50 characters long. The title should be at least 4 characters long. Your display name should be at least 2 characters long. At Kobo, we try to ensure that published reviews do not contain rude or profane language, spoilers, or any of our reviewer's personal information.

Join Kobo & start eReading today

You submitted the following rating and review. We'll publish them on our site once we've reviewed them. Continue shopping. Item s unavailable for purchase. Please review your cart. You can remove the unavailable item s now or we'll automatically remove it at Checkout. Remove FREE.