THE BIG FAT SURPRISE EBOOK DOWNLOAD

admin Comment(0)

In this well-researched and captivating narrative, veteran food writer Nina Teicholz proves how everything we've been told about fat is sidi-its.info decades. The Big Fat Surprise: Why Butter, Meat and Cheese Belong in a Healthy Diet by Nina Teicholz. Read online, or download in secure EPUB format. Ebooks download The Big Fat Surprise: Why Butter, Meat and Cheese Belong in a Healthy Diet. [Free Ebook] For download this book click.


Author: ORLANDO TINKLENBERG
Language: English, Spanish, German
Country: Portugal
Genre: Health & Fitness
Pages: 178
Published (Last): 15.04.2016
ISBN: 327-8-21688-385-1
ePub File Size: 26.82 MB
PDF File Size: 9.76 MB
Distribution: Free* [*Free Regsitration Required]
Downloads: 39735
Uploaded by: ANNIKA

In The Big Fat Surprise, investigative journalist Nina Teicholz reveals the unthinkable: everything we thought we knew about dietary fat is wrong. For the past The Big Fat Surprise. Why Butter, Meat and Cheese Belong in a Healthy Diet. By Nina Teicholz. Trade Paperback. eBook. LIST PRICE $ Price may vary by. Editorial Reviews. Review. "Teicholz may be the Rachel Carson of the nutrition movement. .. Download Audiobooks · Book Depository Books With Free Delivery Worldwide · Box Office Mojo Find Movie Box Office Data · ComiXology. Thousands of.

Slideshare uses cookies to improve functionality and performance, and to provide you with relevant advertising. If you continue browsing the site, you agree to the use of cookies on this website. See our User Agreement and Privacy Policy. See our Privacy Policy and User Agreement for details. Published on Jul 16, SlideShare Explore Search You. Submit Search.

Download surprise big the fat ebook

In following these guidelines, I was convinced that I was doing the best I could for my heart and my waistline, since official sources have been telling us for years that the optimal diet emphasizes lean meats, fruits, vegetables, and grains and that the healthiest fats come from vegetable oils.

Avoiding the saturated fats found in animal foods, especially, seemed like the most obvious measure a person could take for good health.

Why Butter, Meat and Cheese Belong in a Healthy Diet

Then, around , I moved to New York City and started writing a restaurant review column for a small paper. Suddenly I was eating gigantic meals with foods that I would have never before allowed to pass my lips: Eating these rich, earthy dishes was a revelation. They were complex and remarkably satisfying. I ate with abandon. And yet, bizarrely, I found myself losing weight. In fact, I soon lost the 10 pounds that had dogged me for years, and my doctor told me that my cholesterol numbers were fine.

I might have thought no more about it had my editor at Gourmet not asked me to write a story about trans fats, which were little known at the time and certainly nowhere near as notorious as they are today. My article received a good deal of attention and led to a book contract. The deeper I dug into my research, however, the more I became convinced that the story was far larger and more complex than trans fats. The more I probed, the greater was my realization that all our dietary recommendations about fat—the ingredient about which our health authorities have obsessed most during the past sixty years—appeared to be not just slightly offtrack but completely wrong.

The Big Fat Surprise | Book by Nina Teicholz | Official Publisher Page | Simon & Schuster

Almost nothing that we commonly believe today about fats generally and saturated fat in particular appears, upon close examination, to be accurate. Finding out the truth became, for me, an all-consuming, nine-year obsession. I read thousands of scientific papers, attended conferences, learned the intricacies of nutrition science, and interviewed pretty much every single living nutrition expert in the United States, some several times, plus scores more overseas.

I also interviewed dozens of food company executives to understand how that behemoth industry influences nutrition science. The results were startling. In fact, the story of vegetable oils, including trans fats, is partly about how food companies stifled science to protect an ingredient vital to their industry.

Yet I discovered that on the whole, the mistakes of nutrition science could not primarily be pinned on the nefarious interests of Big Food.

The source of our misguided dietary advice was in some ways more disturbing, since it seems to have been driven by experts at some of our most trusted institutions working toward what they believed to be the public good.

Part of the problem is easy to understand.

The Big Fat Surprise: Why Butter, Meat and Cheese Belong in a Healthy Diet

These researchers ran up against an enduring problem in nutrition science, which is that much of it turns out to be highly fallible. Most of our dietary recommendations are based on studies that try to measure what people eat and then follow them for years to see how their health fares. It is, of course, extremely difficult to trace a direct line from a particular element in the diet to disease outcomes many years later, especially given all the other lifestyle factors and variables at play.

The data that emerge from these studies are weak and impressionistic. Yet in the drive to fight heart disease and later obesity and diabetes , these weak data have had to suffice. Indeed, the disturbing story of nutrition science over the course of the last half-century looks something like this: This hypothesis became accepted as truth before it was properly tested. Public health bureaucracies adopted and enshrined this unproven dogma.

The hypothesis became immortalized in the mammoth institutions of public health. While good science should be ruled by skepticism and self-doubt, the field of nutrition has instead been shaped by passions verging on zealotry. And the whole system by which ideas are canonized as fact seems to have failed us. Once ideas about fat and cholesterol became adopted by official institutions, even prominent experts in the field found it nearly impossible to challenge them. It was just like we had desecrated the American flag.

They were so angry that we were going against the suggestions of the American Heart Association and the National Institutes of Health.

Surprise the download ebook fat big

Researchers who persisted in their challenges found themselves cut off from grants, unable to rise in their professional societies, without invitations to serve on expert panels, and at a loss to find scientific journals that would publish their papers.

Their influence was extinguished and their viewpoints lost. As a result, for many years the public has been presented with the appearance of a uniform scientific consensus on the subject of fat, especially saturated fat, but this outward unanimity was only made possible because opposing views were pushed aside. Unaware of the flimsy scientific scaffolding upon which their dietary guidelines rest, Americans have dutifully attempted to follow them.

Since the s, we have successfully increased our fruits and vegetables by 17 percent, our grains by 29 percent, and reduced the amount of fat we eat from 43 percent to 33 percent of calories or less. In these years, Americans also began exercising more.

Fat download big ebook the surprise

Cutting back on fat has clearly meant eating more carbohydrates such as grains, rice, pasta, and fruit. Giving up animal fats has also meant shifting over to vegetable oils, and over the past century the share of these oils has grown from zero to almost 8 percent of all calories consumed by Americans, by far the biggest change in our eating patterns during that time.

In this period, the health of America has become strikingly worse. When the low-fat, low-cholesterol diet was first officially recommended to the public by the American Heart Association AHA in , roughly one in seven adult Americans was obese. Forty years later, that number was one in three. That may sound like a dramatic assertion, and I never would have believed it myself, but one of the most astonishing things I learned over the course of my research was that for thirty years after the low-fat diet had been officially recommended and we were taking its supposed benefits for granted, it had not been subjected to a large-scale, formal scientific trial.

But after a decade of eating more fruits, vegetables, and whole grains while cutting back on meat and fat, these women not only failed to lose weight, but they also did not see any significant reduction in their risk for either heart disease or cancer of any major kind.

WHI was the largest and longest trial ever of the low-fat diet, and the results indicated that the diet had quite simply failed. Now, in , a growing number of experts has begun to acknowledge the reality that making the low-fat diet the centerpiece of nutritional advice for six decades has very likely been a bad idea. Even so, the official solution continues to be more of the same. We are still advised to eat a diet of mostly fruits, vegetables, and whole grains with modest portions of lean meat and low-fat dairy.

Red meat is still virtually banned, as are whole-fat milk, cheese, cream, butter, and, to a lesser extent, eggs.

There are also the Paleo eaters, who swap information on Internet blogs and survive on little else but red meat.

Many of these recent animal foods devotees have been inspired by the doctor whose name is most closely associated with the high-fat diet: Robert C. As we will see, his ideas have endured to a surprising extent and have been the subject of a great deal of scholarship and scientific research in recent years.

But newspapers still carry alarming headlines about how red meat causes cancer and heart disease, and most nutrition experts will tell you that saturated fat is absolutely to be avoided. Hardly anyone advises otherwise. In writing this book, I had the advantage of approaching the field as a scientifically minded outsider free from affiliation with or funding from any entrenched views. Why are we avoiding dietary fat?

Ebook download big fat surprise the

Is that a good idea? Is there a health benefit to avoiding saturated fat and eating vegetable oils instead? With a lively narrative style akin to Michael Pollan's in The Omnivore's Dilemma and the scientific rigor of Gary Taubes in Good Calories, Bad Calories, Teicholz convincingly upends the conventional wisdom about all fats.

Her groundbreaking claim is that more dietary fat leads to better health, wellness, and fitness. Science shows that reducing the saturated fat in our diets has been disastrous for our health as a nation, and we can, guilt-free, welcome these "whole fats" back into our lives.

Blackstone Publishing Imprint: Blackstone Audio, Inc. Unabridged Publication Date: She lives in New York with her husband and two sons. We want your feedback!

You may also like: FULL DOWNLOAD NIV BIBLE EPUB

Click here. Publication Details Publisher: More about Nina Teicholz. The Big Fat Surprise Embed.