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CLICK HERE Download The Alchemist by Paulo Coelho Ebook. Hi if you want to download books in epub or pdf format join groups in telegram and you can. O Alquimista book. Read reviews from the world's largest community for readers. “Quando você quer alguma coisa, todo o Universo conspira para que. El alquimista (Paperback). Published October by Grijalbo. Paperback, . O Alquimista (Paperback). Published by Pergaminho. Paperback,

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I give this book two stars instead of one because I live by a lot of the messages Paulo Coelho puts forth in The Alchemist. I identify with the themes of prioritizing values over fear, pursuing your personal myth, and savoring every moment instead of getting lost in the past or the future. But I could not invest myself the prose or the story of The Alchemist. Coelo's simple writing makes this book a quick, easy read.

It also drains the life out of the book, rendering it an allegory with little e I give this book two stars instead of one because I live by a lot of the messages Paulo Coelho puts forth in The Alchemist. It also drains the life out of the book, rendering it an allegory with little emotional impact. While one might expect fiction to combine deeper messages with quality storytelling, Santiago's flatness as a character and the one-dimensional world of The Alchemist did not come close to touching my heart.

You can get all of the insight of this book and more, as well as ways to apply such knowledge, from wonderful self-help books like Self Compassion by Kristin Neff and Daring Greatly by Brene Brown. Also, I detested the portrayal of romantic love and women in this book. Santiago falls in "love" with Fatima just by looking at her he did the same with another character earlier in the story and she just disappeared without a trace.

And when Santiago leaves Fatima to pursue his journey, Coehlo turns her into a lovesick girl with no interests, desires, or passions other than waiting for Santiago's return. She serves as his romantic interest and nothing more. Their relationship had no substance, and Fatima, as the main female character of the story, deserved so much more development i.

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Overall, I feel glad that The Alchemist can inspire introspection and conversation about deeper life issues like the journey to personal fulfillment and how to thrive in the face of fear. My little cousin, who I love, wrote a stellar essay about this book. The Alchemist , to my great disappointment, just did not work for me. View all 14 comments. View all 40 comments. His quest will lead him to riches far different than he ever imagined.

Let me preface this review by saying that although I did not like this book, I totally appreciate the meaning behind the fable and the message being put forward here well It was just done so in the most tedious and boring way possible. Throughout the entire novel you are just bludgeoned to death with the concept of your Personal Legend.

I am all about pursuing your dreams and not being afraid to do so. Perhaps I am not spiritual enough to fully embrace The Alchemist. I was rolling my eyes so often that I almost detached my retinas And there were some nice illustrations I also found it to be quite preachy and condescending at times.

One and a half stars. View all 5 comments. View all 22 comments. It is a simple book and must have been easy to translate and, even so, it had many issues. I get it — The journey is the destination. View all 8 comments. This book is not playing with a full deck. When Andrew was taking CCD classes to earn his First Communion, one of the things he was given was a dumbed down—and I mean severely dumbed down—booklet of the Gospels.

It mostly ignored John, though, whose Gospel account is too different from the others to reconcile into the mix. If an adult were to read any part of this mishmash, he This book is not playing with a full deck. If an adult were to read any part of this mishmash, he would notice right away how juvenile is the manner in which the stories are recounted.

But the message itself gets through, and I think whoever assembled the booklet probably felt that the message—rather than the specifics—is what was important. Well, reading The Alchemist was, I have to say, a lot like reading one of these infantile booklets. I like that he compares the loathing people have for it to the loathing of what he considers to be other easy targets, like Celine Dion. I also like that he was drunk when he wrote it. But even though nobody in his right mind would ever admit to liking Celine Dion, at least she has an objectively decent voice.

This book, on the other hand, has few redeeming qualities, if any. That is stupid.

Please stop teaching people that. Anwyay, I think the derision this book receives is mostly on account of its peurile philosophizing and that it possibly purports itself to be something greater than it is. For me, though, I see this book as mostly a few bricks short of a load, not the sharpest tool in the shed, and by far not the brightest bulb in the box. But it tries. View all 38 comments. As if! Which universe are we talking about then?

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In all fairness to Paulo Coelho though, The Alchemist is narrated in the style of a fable, and fables are not meant to be taken literally. It all seems very Woodstock to me. I have read online articles about this book praising it for the life lessons it allegedly contains. I have to admit that I have gained no insight at all from reading this book. I tried reading between the lines but all I saw were blank spaces.

This book reminds me a little bit of Life of Pi , though "Pi" is much more appealing. Wait a minute, I am beginning to sound like I am disparaging this allegedly profound little best selling book. I actually quite enjoyed reading it, taken at face value without trying to decipher the meaning of life, the universe and everything it is a fairly entertaining book.

I was not bored at any point, but I did chuckle a few times at how ludicrous I find the philosophical discussions to be. The trouble with the fable format is that I could not believe any of it anymore than I can believe a wolf can blow houses down unless it is some kind of cyborg wolf. The characters in this novel do not behave in the way real people do. For example, the protagonist Santiago declares his love for the desert girl Fatima on their first meeting and she does not bat an eyelid.

She even agrees to wait for him for however long he takes to complete his life mission to achieve his Personal Legend. Surely even love at first sight is more subtle than this.

The numerous sage passages are mostly nonsensical to me. But everything that happens twice will surely happen a third time. How is anything supposed to happen twice let alone thrice if they can not happen more than once? Am I reading this too literally again? Gimme some of that weed man! The audiobook I read is beautifully narrated by Jeremy Irons who sounds almost exactly like Neil Gaiman here if you have listened to Neil Gaiman narrating a book you will know what I mean.

A huge improvement on his reading of Lolita which I think is a little over the top and rendered that book harder to follow. So, my Goodreads friends, is this a good read? Laughable philosophy notwithstanding, it passes the time pleasantly enough.

Highly recommended if you are going to San Francisco wearing some flowers in your hair. Paulo and his esteem-treasure-hunters I'm never been this mad on myself huh! It is one thing to read a great book and be inspired. It is an entirely different thing for the author to throw it in your face If you have Paulo and his esteem-treasure-hunters If you haven't started this book, don't bother. I will give it enough credit to say it was better than the Nanny Diaries. Although anything would be a better read than that horrid excuse for a book Sorry, still mad at myself at wasting time on reading something so awful.

Well do your self a favor and read it as last book on planet left View all 11 comments. Dec 25, Dream. View all 34 comments. Not my cup of tea. I feel like it tries way too hard to be all profound and intellectual but ends up being just portentous. I understand why it got so popular, it surely is quotable, but for me it seems too preachy, pretentious and I really disliked flimsy portrayal of women in this book.

If you're looking for a story about some inspirational journey, "The Journey to the East" by Hermann Hesse is a million times better. That one is actu Rating: That one is actually profound without all the pomposity of "The Alchemist". Ne man tokios knygos. Gavos pompastika. View all 3 comments. I do not feel this book is a new addition for me!

I am Faithful and the Faithful knows that: God is give us all the universe.. I do not know the real reason behind the dazzle of some readers do, but only if they are of those who suffer from spiritual emptiness and lack of awareness and faith! View all 12 comments. This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers.

To view it, click here. While this book made some points that I agreed with all things in the universe are one; a person is happiest when living in the present moment, rather than the past or future; even things that seem like detours in your quest toward achieving your goals can be rich opportunities for learning I just couldn't buy a lot of it.

For instance, I disagreed with the idea that your experience along the way shouldn't cause you to change your basic course. What's accumulated wisdom and experience for, if While this book made some points that I agreed with all things in the universe are one; a person is happiest when living in the present moment, rather than the past or future; even things that seem like detours in your quest toward achieving your goals can be rich opportunities for learning I just couldn't buy a lot of it.

What's accumulated wisdom and experience for, if not to cause us to live differently often with very different goals, aspirations, and fundamental beliefs than we did when we were younger? I also couldn't buy the notion that your "Personal Legend" is made manifest to you in no uncertain terms when you are a child and you should never deviate from it.

I dreamed of doing a hundred different things at various times during my childhood. More than one of those aspirations psychiatrist, teacher, stay-at-home mom, sociologist at one time or another during my youth seemed, without question, like the path I should follow. As I get dangerously close to middle age, I'm finding that I'm really happy as a horticulturist and constantly learning and doing new things within that field.

I feel no regret at not having pursued those other paths. Also, I was left with the impression that the "Personal Legend" of the main female character in the story was to send kisses on the wind and wait for the safe return of her man.

I thought the book made an important point: But that should, obviously, be true for both partners. I'll give the author the benefit of the doubt and assume that he didn't focus much on Fatima's goals and dreams because that's not whose story he was telling. I'm hoping that, though she takes time out of her day to think of her love and pray for his safe return, she's spending more of her time pursuing dreams of her own.

View 2 comments. It was all the way back in when I was lovingly passed down a copy of The Alchemist from my grandfather, its worn out pages and his words a promise that I was about to read something truly remarkable, something life-changing. I was ten years old then. The only thing I can still recall is feeling rather proud of the fact that I'd actually managed to finish the whole book.

I'm seventeen years old now. And the only thing I know is that I simply cannot get myself to finish the whole book anymore. Whi It was all the way back in when I was lovingly passed down a copy of The Alchemist from my grandfather, its worn out pages and his words a promise that I was about to read something truly remarkable, something life-changing.

While I'm sure I probably didn't understand the true meaning of the book in its depth —or perhaps even at all— the first time round, I did, in fact, re-read the climax later on and distinctly remember being left in awe by it. But alas, years have passed and my views have come a long way with it. Any deep, profound message that Paulo Coelho intended to part our way failed to move me in any sense other than to literally shake my head and roll my eyes. It was never the type of book I'd typically find myself invested in, nor did it go ahead to prove that fact otherwise.

Only the devil will leave you in a waiting room for three hours without any reading material. So I took this as an omen and went ahead and looked for a new dentist. But before I found one, the Soul of the World orchestrated the natural flow of things so that I should come across a copy of this book, and my diaphanous frustration compelled me to buy and read this work I've avoided until today. I have this particular belief that books I see in most houses that I've been to, if not all, are overrat Only the devil will leave you in a waiting room for three hours without any reading material.

I have this particular belief that books I see in most houses that I've been to, if not all, are overrated. To me, The Alchemist was no exception. I read it under 3 or 4 hours which is probably because of the simplicity both in the story and in the prose, both were straightforward and linear.

But it was nothing like Hemingway's style. It is retrospective but please, do not even imagine comparing this work to Siddhartha 4 Stars , as some people do. Siddhartha is the work you read to experience a trance-like retrospective examination of life, in comparison, the only thing that made its mark in The Alchemist was the fantasy part, which I have to admit I see as a considerable digression for a ruminative retrospective novel. It does talk about love as the universal language of the world, that all of us are one but I had this feeling that The Alchemist barely scratched the surface of this reservoir of ruminative philosophy which led to an occasional overtly pretentious and over-reaching feel.

Coelho's telling us that the happiness we seek is within us, as evinced by how this novel started and ended, what I can't curiously reconcile however is the fact that it was someone else's dream that completed his journey, as if negating the very message it seeks to impart.

Just my two cents anyway. This review along with other reviews has been cross-posted at imbookedindefinitely View all 28 comments. Some lovely philosophical musings and plot devices to prove some long recognized adages. A few passages gave me pause and I even re-read one or two to make sure I understood them. At least not for me. View all 13 comments. This meme sums up my feelings on this book perfectly: View all 4 comments. Actual rating is 2. Additionally, it has been closer to three stars, but something gave me no rest.

I have tried to like it, but it constantly kept going on my nerves. I suppose you either love or hate Coelho and in my case the answer is obvious. I may try another one of his works just to be sure we can't be friends, but it's not gonna happen anytime soon.

Yeah, I don't like this story. One of my best friends did, and since we have similar taste in books, I thought I would too. I was spe Actual rating is 2. I was spectacularly disappointed. This book isn't even good for children because it gives you the wrong impression of life. Too many times I was outrages by some of our narrator's opinions. A teenage boy Santiago follows his 'Personal Legend' in travelling from Spain to the Pyramids in Egypt searching for hidden treasure. Along the way, he learns 'the Language of the World' and the 'Soul of the World'.

This is the story about a boy who abandons everything so he could fulfil his destiny or whatever. The book is basically about how everyone have only one true path.

It certainly makes you think about your life and choices, but the whole story is packed up as a fairy tale which only added to it looking even more unbelievable.

It's wrapped up in so many unrealistic thoughts and selfish tone, nonetheless the message it sends is quite disturbing. What if you can't pursue your Personal Legend because you have to take care of your family, for example? The way this idea was presented, it seems like you're a coward because that's just "an obstacle" and you're not persistent enough.

The writing style is plain and fast-paced, but I don't think it allowed characters to grow. Everyone remained two dimensional. They're patronising and pretentious, with horribly boring monologues of "wisdom".

I also wasn't invested in the protagonist at all. Yes, he's travelling around the world, seeing cool stuff while trying to follow his Personal Legend, but I just couldn't give a damn what happens to him.

It seems the main message is that as long as you stay true to your heart and seek out your Personal Legend the universe will help you fulfil it. This way of thinking can only disappoint you immensely and help you live like a parasite.

There is no cosmic energy that will make sure things turn out the way you want. This notion is not only false, but unacceptable. Just because we want something, it doesn't mean it's right. The book attempted to be deep and better version of "Little Prince" but failed significantly. This looks like a self-help book and honestly, I hate them.

If everyone simply went off on a spiritual journeys and gave up their responsibilities, we would live in pure anarchy.

I'm not saying people shouldn't chase their happiness, I'm just contemplating that people should seek it with regards towards others around them. I admit it's a nice idea that wherever you go, your true love will wait for you, but it just doesn't work in real life. This is a story about self discovery, awakening your passions, following your heart and finding the courage to chase your dreams. Those are all fine goals but honestly, I don't need some pretentious author telling me how to live my life with questionable magic and alchemy.

The main character accepts new ideals, learns new things, but he abandons everything in search for his gold. He travels to beautiful places, meets interesting people, and falls in love, but none of that matters because he wants the gold. All that search had cost him all his money, friends and family and left him alone in an oasis. Check out my blog!

View all 10 comments. I always liked reading, but only after joining Goodreads in December last year did books become a lifelong love that I can't go a day without. I still consider myself a beginner in reading literature, but my sensibilities and tastes have changed greatly over these eight months as I've spent more time than ever before reading books and book reviews , and consequently I've been reevaluating re-rating books from the past quite often.

I stumbled upon this book in my Read shelf before and it broug I always liked reading, but only after joining Goodreads in December last year did books become a lifelong love that I can't go a day without. I stumbled upon this book in my Read shelf before and it brought back some memories pleasant to recall.

If I read this Internationally Bestselling Phenomenon as on the cover now I would only rate it two stars at most - but when I read this in March on a flight back from Vietnam, it meant quite a lot to me. Nowadays I can laugh jovially at the person I was back then, but the 'I' who was reading the novel seems to be on a different plane of consideration - the fact that I cherished this novel at the time seems to me like a drawer which connects my current self with that year old reading on that plane, in a single instant, through the book.

There's the life we lead, and the many lives we lead inside the pages, but I'm glad that this year I feel like my life as a reader has finally begun. It is the same in life; the heart changes, and it is our worst sorrow; but we know it only through reading, through our imagination: View all 17 comments.

A book that helps non-readers start off 1 2 Mar 16, The Alchemist by Paulo Coelho 4 stars rounded 3 16 Feb 16, Readers Also Enjoyed. About Paulo Coelho. Now, there's an alchemist for you: Queen Wiki can turn knowledge into nonsense and then back again before your very eyes.

The perfect Oracle for this book. Queen Wiki turned out to be very entertaining and illuminating in this case. I learned that Joe Jonas and Russell Crowe loved this book. I glommed on to this as an omen that absurdity was lurking close. I interpreted it as a sign that I must continue.

Again, I was struck by the irony of that, but turning back to the book, this fleeting insight that might have had a grain of real value was immediately squelched. I sipped some sweet tea from a crystal goblet, and plodded on through the desert of thought that is this book. This, I felt, was the lesson to be learned: Absurdity goes unrecognized. Skepticism is turned back at the gates by ill-formed philosophies based on the unwavering power of evangelical groupthink and our species' rather fascinating susceptibility to cognitive bias, or errors in thinking, that cause us to believe as truth that which can actually be scientifically validated as false.

This book makes a mockery of spirituality and the search for truth and meaning, under the guise of the easy, anxiety-quelling New Age philosophies that spoon-feed the stupid with Twitter-sized bites of nonsense.

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Beliefs like, "good things happen to good people. If it's not right, it's not the end. Do not trade or give away--you'll just be spreading the bullshit. My heart will go on. I read this book about three years ago and just had to re-read it for book club. It was a steaming pile of crap then and, guess what? The main reason I hate this book: You go into it thinking that it's going to be about a boy's quest for treasure.

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If you read the back, there are words like "Pyramids," "Gypsy," "alchemist. It's Hallmark Hall of Fame territory set in an exotic locale. Which pisses me off to no end as I normally try to dodge that sort of thing, but here it is masquerading as the type of book I normally like.

It's cliche, didactic, and poorly written. Just as with Aesop's Fables , there's a moral to the story. And Coelho keeps backing up and running over it just to make sure that we get it and he capitalizes important key words necessary to understanding it, lest we overlook their significance. If there's one thing Paulo Coelho can do, it's flog a dead horse. Essentially, boy thinks he's happy in life. He's a shepherd who gets to travel the world, has all of his needs met, and owns a book which he can always trade for another book when he goes to market.

What more can a boy need? Boy is then told by a mysterious stranger that he's not happy at all.

Editions of The Alchemist by Paulo Coelho

Why not? He has failed to recognize his Personal Legend. Everyone has a Personal Legend, which is life's plan for you. However, most of us give up on our Personal Legend in childhood. If you are fortunate enough to hang onto and pursue your Personal Legend, then The Soul of the World will help you obtain it.

All of nature conspires to bring you luck and good fortune so that you can fulfill your destiny, whether it's to be a shepherd on a quest for treasure at the pyramids, a butcher, a baker, a candlestick maker, or, one would assume, a prostitute, drug dealer, or porn star. Hey, we're all fate's bitch in The Alchemist. But I digress. Boy seeks out his Personal Legend and finds it's a long, hard road to obtaining what you want in life.

But with faith, perseverance, and just a little goshdarnit good luck, the boy learns to speak the Language of the World and tap into The Soul of the World and fulfills his Personal Legend.

And what does he learn? That what he sought was back home, the place he started from. Oh, silly boy. So, in summation, here is what you should learn from The Alchemist: And, while you're at it, dream BIG 2 Follow your bliss 3 Don't be surprised if you find obstacles in your way, but you will overcome 4 It's good to travel and encounter people from other cultures 5 What we most often seek is right in front of us, but sometimes we have to leave home to realize it To all of these important life lessons, I can only say, "Well, no shit, Sherlock.

Alas, it's still crap. Cross posted at This Insignificant Cinder View all 59 comments. View all 77 comments. Preachy, pretentious, and awful portrayal of women. View all 25 comments. If books were pills, Alchemist would be a sugarcoated placebo with no real effect. Let's call it a feel-good homily. I have never read a book as meretricious as this one. Many reviewers have pointed out the problems with this 'celebrated' novel so I'd rather not expend any more words. Suffice it so say that this is a good example of portentous writing that is best avoided if your benchmark is quality literature.

View all 58 comments. View all 84 comments. Everyone save one guy said I would love this book. Three of my four roommates have their own copies. That one guy was right. Now this may be because he planted that seed of discontent, or it may be because this was the least creative and most redundant book I've read in a while.

That said, I didn't hate it. Two of the central themes which were hammered in over an Everyone save one guy said I would love this book. Two of the central themes which were hammered in over and over again are two of my favorite world views - ones I hold very dear to my heart. I understand that everyone has their own path and if it takes this silly little book to realize these two important messages, I'm just happy the reader finally discovered these truths.

See the pattern. To explain my aversion to the third nail in the coffin of stolen redundancy, I will tell you story. I have a small collection of fortunes from fortune cookies. I have always been in the habit of collecting good omens. To make the list, a fortune must convey a good message when applied to life and even better when the requisite "Dirty Fortune Cookie Ending" is added.

During my freshman year of college, I got the fortune "Where your treasure is, there will your heart be also. Sex, love, treasure, oh the glorious metaphors. Straight out the OT. Well, I was shocked and appalled. I was being proselytized to by a cookie! Now, I realize that this is my own issue, but I don't want a bible-thumping cookie or year old Alchemist ramming the OT down my throat.

To anyone thinking about reading this book, I have given you the two things that need be learned from it. Now go read some Joseph Campbell. View all 12 comments. For my dear friends Matt and Jean-Paul! I once read a book that inspired me to change my whole attitude towards reading. It was a medicine of universal, cosmic impact. Before, I had thought that books existed to enrich me, giving me knowledge, pleasure and understanding.

After reading the introductory pages of this "enchanting novel" however, I learned that more wisdom can be For my dear friends Matt and Jean-Paul! After reading the introductory pages of this "enchanting novel" however, I learned that more wisdom can be gained from the companionship of sheep than from books, as stated by the wise young protagonist, a shepherd who uses books for a pillow and sheep for dialogue partners it is a one-way road, with the sheep as teachers, for the sheep don't learn anything from him.

In simple, unsophisticated prose, which seems to be carefully following the rubric of a Grade 6 descriptive writing assignment, I read: As long as the boy knew how to find the best pastures in Andalusia, they would be his friends. Yes, their days were all the same, with the seemingly endless hours between sunrise and dusk; and they had never read a book in their young lives, and didn't understand when the boy told them about the sights of the cities.

They were content with just food and water, and, in exchange, they generously gave of their wool, their company, and - once in a while - their meat. But I do have a question or two: If the sheep are only his"friends" as long as he brings them food, do they really count as friends?

Are they not just following their needs? Is it not quite self-evident that they have not read any books in their young lives - they are sheep after all, and won't read in their old age either, I assume? At least as far as the meat is concerned, I am sure they offer it once, and not again, and not by free choice, and generously? As this book is to be taken seriously, I beg to accept my apology if my questions sound like sarcasm.

That is not my intention. I am really just asking "all universe to conspire to help me achieve my goal" another piece of wisdom the book offers - of understanding how anyone can take this seriously! I just wonder how all universe deals with opposing wishes, which must occasionally occur, even in a small place like our earth. If I for example wish to have my neighbour's garden chair, and my neighbour wishes to keep it, who does "all universe" side with, and how does it conspire to help me get it, and at the same time to help my neighbour to keep it?

Things that happen once can never happen again, I also learn. Before I can even ask why, I get another piece of information: Things that happen twice will always happen again. How does that go together?

If things have happened once which is a prerequisite for happening twice in my world they won't happen again?!? I can't travel to Italy twice. If I do it anyway which is not possible I will definitively do it again. That is nice! When I do travel to Italy once, or three times , my life and my path will always provide me with enough omens.

That is interesting, and I do not know why I all of a sudden associate this with the sheepish followers in Life Of Brian, who found omens in sandals.

Call me literal-minded, but I do have some issues with the idea of omen provision. Can I order them online nowadays? What do they cost? To close my reflection on learning more from sheep than books, I have to say: In some cases, that is very true! What a bitter medicine! As with all medicines, there are some side effects, and it is very important to read the warning before you take this drug: Please do not read this book if you are in danger of thinking too rationally.

When you read this Grade 6 essay, be careful to check if you show behaviours that you would define as out of character, as they might be symptoms of acute drivel reading allergy. Symptoms include: Symptoms may vary, but in all cases, it is recommended to suspend reading until the brain is reset in adequate sheep mode again. If symptoms do not diminish after enjoying a couple of good, real books, please see your librarian for memory removal surgery or therapy.

View all 80 comments. I simply could not finish this book. I got halfway through it only to wind up on goodreads. I simply felt guilty panning a book that has received such global acclaim; more than that, I felt lame and inadequate. Well, it turns out that my sentiments were echoed. I basically felt I was reading an overblown parable and that the same lessons were being spelled out again and again.

It was like the 16th verse of a hymn. Throughout my life I have periodically reflected to I simply could not finish this book. Throughout my life I have periodically reflected to get a sense of who I am, where I am going and whether I want to end up there. I am an extremely introspective person and I am constantly evaluating and re-evaluating my person; sometimes for the better, sometimes out of necessity.

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To put a fine point on it, I regularly do that which is, for lack of a better word, preached in this book. The problem I had with The Alchemist is that instead of feeling reinforced and validated, I felt uncomfortable and nagged. View all 13 comments.

Superficially deep ie deep on the surface and shallow underneath , but actually rather pretentious new age waffle - yet somehow manages to be beautiful despite that.

Reading, and disliking this, was something of a watershed: View all 41 comments. Greg To those planning to read this: Mar 31, Cecily Greg wrote: I'm almost wondering if I should reread it! Well, I want that week of my life back yes, a week; I ended up avoiding that thing.

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The Aesop's fables that came with my chocolates brought me more inspiration than this book. I knew it wasn't my kind of thing. But, it was a recommendation, and everybody was talking about it, so I tried. Dream big. Make that dream come true, no matter what. Fin "When you want something, the whole universe conspires in helping you to achieve it".

Find your treasure. Universe this, universe that. I want that week back. View all 50 comments. A spanish shepherd boy santiago has these recurring dreams about a treasure hidden at the foot of the egyptian pyramids. He leaves Spain to find it and journeys to the markets of Tangiers and across the Egyptian desert, guided along the way by a camel driver, an alchemist and other spiritual guides.

Though the Alchemist is not about Santiago at all. It's an inspirational fable; it's A spanish shepherd boy santiago has these recurring dreams about a treasure hidden at the foot of the egyptian pyramids. It's an inspirational fable; it's about our own self discovery; it's about awakening your passions; it's about following your heart; embracing life as a journey and finding the courage to chase your dreams. It felt more like a really hackneyed self-help book to me.

I don't know if it makes great literature. What is great literature? View all 11 comments. The Alchemist has been translated into like a million languages, and it feels like it. Bland sentences, simple story telling and zero nuance. It's a quaint parable about a shepherd who bucks the current course of his life - shepherding - to go in search of his Personal Legend Coehlo's caps, and phrase. Coehlo's got a point, and he's going to drive it through your eyeball until he's absolutely sure you've got it.

If you ignore much of the language of the book, this is a paper-thin rehashing of R The Alchemist has been translated into like a million languages, and it feels like it. If you ignore much of the language of the book, this is a paper-thin rehashing of Rand-like individualism Atlas Shrugged The Fountainhead. No one can show you your way but yourself. Step out on your own and you are invincible. But all the trappings of this moral story are mystical platitudes.

Learning to read them is communicating with the Soul of the World and the hand that wrote all. View all 9 comments. I made it through a few pages before throwing it across the room. Then I picked it up, skimmed a few more pages and threw it in the bin.

Then I washed my brain, eyes and fingers with bleach. Belongs with things like The Secret in the deepest depths of Book-Hell. View all 17 comments. I picked up this book in an airport between flights, it's been pretty hyped up and was obviously the most-purchased book from the store.

Even the girl on the plane next to me, obviously not an english-speaker, took great efforts to tell me that she loved this book. The book's protagonist is an adolescent shepherd and reads as if it were written by one.

Coelho abandons all subtlety, capitalizing the phrase "Personal Legend" and using it every other page in a story that has the ingredients of a su I picked up this book in an airport between flights, it's been pretty hyped up and was obviously the most-purchased book from the store.

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It's initial message of 'follow your passion' is soon altered to 'the story of your life is written by the same hand who wrote the story of the world' and then to 'the heart of alchemy is the Soul of the World [sic] which all should strive to join. Needless to say I didn't read any of the "Plus" aspects of this edition. View all 6 comments. My father recently sent me an email offering to buy me a book as a birthday present, and asking me if there was something in particular that I wanted.

But very often, he hits painfully far from the mark in his attempt to convert me to his literary tastes. Dad likes his books poetic, inspiring, challenging but not too much. And the most annoying part is that he very earnestly feels inspired by the sort of sentimental drivel that he persist in peddling at me. I understand he just wants me to listen to my heart, go after my dreams and do things I am really passionate about. Just like the book, his intention is really good, but the ham-fisted delivery, full of unrealistic and impractical advice, is just painful.

This book is an un-subtle, preachy New Age story about a Spanish shepherd named Santiago who dreams of a treasure buried by the pyramids of Egypt. So, naturally, he dumps his flock, goes to Morocco, falls in love, travels to Egypt and realizes the treasure was love all along.

Easy for him to follow his dreams, as he has no family to take care of, no rent to pay, no one to be accountable to.

This brand of delusional magical-thinking is actually incredibly damaging, because it encourages people not to worry too much about the consequences of their actions — why would you care if you are deeply convinced everything will work out well for you?

View all 42 comments. View all 5 comments. I actually hated this book - when I finished it I threw it on the floor and if it wasn't borrowed id throw it straight in the bin. Normally there is at least one redeeming quality to a book - however the alchemist has none.

Honestly, i struggle to see what anyone sees in it. An 8 year old could read it and even they would probably be bored. I mean every supposedly dramatic realisation was blindingly simplistic. And even the way it was written was simple, I mean can you remember when you were a k I actually hated this book - when I finished it I threw it on the floor and if it wasn't borrowed id throw it straight in the bin.

And even the way it was written was simple, I mean can you remember when you were a kid and in a book it would explain something then get the character to repeat it like 'The sky is cloudly, it might rain today.

Tom says to his mum "It looks like it will rain"' I know crap example! And the story isn't even worth it - basically it takes over pages to tell you what destiny is. Utter rubbish.

View all 8 comments. Finally, dragged myself through the last chapters. There are so many kinds of wrong in this book. I don't know where to start! Its major fault is a pretension to depth and greatness when the whole is very shallow indeed. Anyway, more to come later. Just terrible.